Sunday, February 23, 2020

Tom Waits on The dead don't die OST

The soundtrack of the Jim Jarmusch movie The dead don't die contains a spoken word track by Tom Waits. It's a short (36 seconds) clip entitled Dialogue 8.


Sunday, December 08, 2019

Tom Waits by Matt Mahurin

Just a quick reminder Tom Waits by Matt Mahurin is now available at Amazon et al.

The special edition (250 copies, slip case, with a signed and numbered print of the cover of Mule variations) is sold out.

UPDATE Dec. 9: Looks like Abrams Books still has some copies of the limited edition for sale.





Tom Waits: the acting years

Film journalist Leigh Singer posted an essay on Tom Waits' acting carreer on Vimeo.


Saturday, December 07, 2019

Happy birthday

On December 7, 1949, Thomas Alan Waits was born to Jesse Frank Waits and Alma Johnson McMurray.


Saturday, August 31, 2019

Women singing Waits

Dualtone Music Group is releasing an album with Waits covers by female singers, such as Aimee Mann and Patty Griffin. Come on up to the house: Women sing Waits is out November 22.

Tracklist:
  • Joseph - Come on up to the house
  • Aimee Mann - Hold on
  • Phoebe Bridgers - Georgia Lee
  • Shelby Lynne & Allison Moorer - Ol’ 55
  • Angie McMahon - Take it with me
  • Corinne Bailey Rae - Jersey girl
  • Patty Griffin - Ruby’s arms
  • Rosanne Cash - Time
  • Kat Edmonson - You can never hold back spring
  • Iris Dement - House where nobody lives
  • Courtney Marie Andrews - Downtown train
  • The Wild Reeds - Tom Traubert’s blues




RIP Larry Taylor

Canned Heat's management published a statement bass player Larry Taylor has died.

Larry Taylor played, amongst others, with Canned Heat and The Monkees. Tom Waits fans know him from his contributions to many Waits albums, ranging from Heartattack and Vine to Bad as Me, as well as numerous live shows.

From the statement Tom Waits and Kathleen Brennan posted on TomWaits.com:
‘The eloquence of his talent is evident in the many recordings and live show bootleg videos and TV performances that featured his musical muscle.’